All World Machinery grows in Roscoe

By HILLARY GAVAN

For Stateline Business Journal

ROSCOE — Business is booming at All World Machinery Supply, Inc. thanks to its newly expanded capability to service more machines for manufacturers, according to Marketing Manager Mitch Koepp and Director of Corporate Planning and Operations Yuya “Kenny” Kimura.
All World, 6164 All World Way, is a leading supplier of hydraulic equipment and machine tool parts. It serves the automotive, aerospace, semiconductor, plastics, fixturing and agricultural industries. The business continues to grow at a rate of 20 to 25 percent a year at its facility located on 19.57 acres along Willowbrook Road, off Interstate 39/90 and just north of the Rockton Road exit.
Since the company began in 1993, it has supplied a variety of parts and components such as pumps, motors, bearings, sensors, switches, belts, cylinders, valves, seals, o-rings, and hydraulic and pneumatic systems. It specializes in, but isn’t limited to, Japanese parts for Japanese machines, which have taken over the machine tool market since the mid 1980s.
Six months ago company officials decided to expand from only servicing parts of machines at its warehouse and distribution facility to servicing the entire machine.
Since launching the new offering, the company has serviced a dozen machines including one for Regal Cutting Tools. In many cases All World is rehabilitating aging machines or adding more modern control or hydraulic systems to them.
Recently, for example, All World rebuilt a 1968 Bohle flutemaster machine that wasn’t performing well. Those at All World worked at scraping, re-grinding and adding CNC controls to the machine.
“It saves money for customers because they don’t have to buy a new machine, and in the case of Regal Cutting Tools, the machine was so efficient the company beefed up production. They were able to handle larger loads on the machine and handle different size parts,” Koepp said.
Koepp noted it can be time consuming for a company to service its own machines as the business might not have the necessary parts in house, whereas All World carries $6 million worth of inventory. Although some companies send out their machines to other service centers, few carry the inventory All World has in its 80,000-square-foot facility. Some companies may try to work on the machines in-house, but could be waiting for six to eight weeks for a part to arrive.
With a 40,000-square-foot service center, there is plenty of space to work on machines at All World. Koepp noted machines can be up to room-size and most require a 20-ton crane to move. Currently, All World has two machines in its service
center.
Koepp said servicing capabilities at the company first started to grow in 2008.
“Our engineering capabilities have gone way up because we have hired several engineers and are focusing on more specific hydraulic systems,” Koepp said.
All World’s parent company is the DAIKIN group. All World represents the oil hydraulics division of DAIKIN Industries in North America. DAIKIN, a Japanese company, is the number one air conditioning manufacturer in the world. DAIKIN is opening a plant in Houston this year, the 40th largest building in the world.

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